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100 BLACKS IN LAW ENFORCEMENT WHO CARE

591 Vanderbilt Avenue, Suite 133, Brooklyn, NY 11238

(718) 455-9059

EMAIL: BlacksNLaw@aol.com

 

 

WHAT TO DO WHEN STOPPED

BY THE POLICE

 

 

 

INFORMATION KIT

 

 

 

Terrance Wansley

Minister of Public Relations

 

 

 

100 BLACKS IN LAW ENFORCEMENT WHO CARE

HISTORY: "100 Blacks" was founded in 1995 by a core group of concerned African Americans representing a variety of professions within the field of law enforcement. The number of those men and women who wanted to participate in being part of a social solution instead of a passive problem quickly grew to 100 and beyond. These individuals all shared a sense of community, cultural and professional pride. This pride was accompanied by an unfulfilled desire to "give back" in some meaningful way. Through skillful organization and administration, 100 Blacks in Law Enforcement Who Care was born. In that first year, $10,000 in grant monies was collected from the membership and distributed to needy individuals and organizations all over the City of New York.

MISSION:

1) To fulfill our moral mandate to our creator, to enhance and cultivate the blessings that have been bestowed upon us.

2) To serve as a model organization for individuals and other professionals in our communities so that we can again take our rightful place on the stage of history as a free, proud, and productive people.

3) To offer (via non repayable grants) a minimum of $1,000 a month to a worthy cause in the African American community

4) To be the vanguard for justice on the behalf of those who traditionally have no voice in society

5) To vigorously challenge racism, sexism and all of the debilitating ism's that retard the growth of today's global community

6) To economically empower our people by pooling our resources

7)To uplift our people through education

WE VOW TO NEVER STOP UNTIL VICTORY IS WON !

 

IF STOPPED IN THE STREET BY POLICE...

REMAIN CALM

DO NOT reach into your pockets.

ASK why you are being stopped.

You can be stopped if:

1. You are running and a crime has just been reported in the area.

2. You are hanging around with some people who are under police investigation for one thing or another.

3. You are near an area where a crime has just been reported.

4. You are somewhere where an officer thinks people have no reason to be at that time of day or night.

5. You are acting in a way that appears to the officer to be very suspicious, and

you act even more suspicious when the officer sees you have spotted her/him.

6. An officer thinks that you have stolen property in your possession.

7. An officer stops you walking and you refuse to answer simple questions, give false or evasive answers or make contradicting statements.

8. Someone has pointed you out to an officer.

9. You begin to bad-mouth an officer.

DO NOT BECOME LOUD.

KEEP SOME LEGITIMATE FORM OF IDENTIFICATION ON YOU AT ALL TIMES.

REMAIN SILENT. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT OF SILENCE, USE IT.

YOU ALWAYS HAVE THE RIGHT FOR LEGAL REPRESENTATION - NEVER SPEAK WITHOUT A WITNESS BEING PRESENT.

Remember: Depending upon the circumstances, the officer may think he/she has probable cause to stop you or he/she will use any excuse to harass you.

 

WHEN THE POLICE KNOCK AT YOUR DOOR...

IF the police knock at your door and ask to come in, you do not have to let them in unless they have a warrant signed by a judge. If they have a warrant, ask to see it.

IF IT IS AN ARREST WARRANT, CHECK the name to make sure they have the right person.

IF IT IS A SEARCH WARRANT, make sure it is for your specific address. LOOK to see what is listed on the warrant to be searched for in your home.

IF the warrant is proper, you must allow them in.

IF the police do not have a warrant you may let them in BUT you do not have to let them in unless they insist on coming in. Try to settle the issue at the door. If they do insist over your objections, then be careful to:

IF you are not sure that they are really police officers ask for the name of the highest ranking officer present at your door and a phone number where his identity can be verified. Call his/her command number, and even 911 so that a record can be established.

FIRST, Ask for a police badge.

SECOND, Ask them what their purpose is in coming into your house.

THIRD, If you object, make sure you tell them you do not consent to any search of your home.

FOURTH, Write down the names, badge numbers, physical description of the officers and the date and time.

IF the police take any of your property, they are REQUIRED TO GIVE YOU A WRITTEN RECEIPT for it.

IF they don't give you a receipt, ask for it. They are not required to give you a receipt for the property they intend to book as evidence such as stolen property, guns, etc.

The police may also search without a warrant whenever they have arrested a person. They may search his person and the area close by where the arrest was made.

They may also search after consent is given, so if you object, be sure to make it clear that you do not agree to any kind of search.

They may also search when there is an emergency (for example, someone screaming for help inside your home) or when they are chasing you or someone else into your home. This is called the EMERGENCY EXCEPTION.

 

IF YOU ARE STOPPED BY THE POLICE

IN YOUR CAR...

 

A Police Officer can ask you to pull over at any time. You will be asked for your driver's license and registration. If she/he asks for this information, you MUST comply.

IF you are stopped - pull over and sit tight.

 

IF you are stopped at night - turn on your interior dome light.

 

PLACE your hands on the steering wheel.

 

PRODUCE your identification when asked.

 

REMAIN CALM. NO SUDDEN MOVES !!!!

 

 

 

WHEN AN INCIDENT OCCURS...

 

Whenever an incident involving the police occurs, ALWAYS:

 

Look at the badge number and name tag of the officers.

 

Remember it and write it down as soon as possible.

 

If badge and name are not in full view, make note of the physical description of the officers.

 

Look for the Precinct Number or the Division (Transit, Housing, etc.) This can be found on the brass insignia on the officer's shirt collar.

 

Make note of the number of officers present.

 

Make note of any witnesses.

 

Take note of where you are.

 

Take note of when (date, time of day) the incident occurred.

 

A L W A Y S WRITE EVERYTHING DOWN AS SOON AS POSSIBLE!!

 

TIPS ON RECORDING AN INCIDENT

Whenever an incident occurs, as immediately as possible, solicit all the facts. Speak with all involved and all who witnessed it.

ASK 1. WHEN?

2. WHERE?

3. WHO?

4. WHAT?

5. HOW?

6. WHY?

WHEN DID THE INCIDENT OCCUR?

The date and time.

WHERE DID THE INCIDENT OCCUR?

In the home, on the street, in the school?

Be as specific as possible. (IE. the southeast corner of 163rd Street and Main Road)

WHO WAS INVOLVED IN THE INCIDENT?

The victims

The witnesses

Their names, addresses, phone numbers, and a description of them, what they were wearing, any weapons involved.

WHAT KIND OF AN INCIDENT?

What started the incident?

What weapon was used?

HOW DID THE INCIDENT GET STARTED?

How was it dealt with?

WHY DID THE INCIDENT OCCUR?

Write everything down. Be clear. Do not be suggestive, just ask basic questions.

Ask questions individually away from others to avoid the confusion of stories. If possible, try to visit the scene of the incident with the victim or witness and go over the incident.

Take keen note of the surroundings for comparison with stories being told.

 

 

RESOURCES

100 Blacks In Law Enforcement Who Care. 591 Vanderbilt Avenue, Suite #133, Brooklyn, NY 11238. 718 -455-9059. E-Mail: BlacksNLaw@aol.com

American Friends Service Committee, 1501 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19102. Phone: 215-241-7130, Fax: 215-241-7275. Pat Clark, National Criminal Justice Representative

Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund. 99 Hudson Street, 12th Floor, New York, New York 10013. Phone: 212-966-5932, Fax: 212-966-4303. Liz Ou Yang.

The Anthony Baez Foundation, 6 Cameron Place, Bronx, N.Y. 10453. Phone: 718-364-2879. Iris Baez, Chairperson.

Black Cops Against Police Brutality. PO Box 4256, East Orange, NJ 07019. DeLacey Davis, Phone: 201-926-5717 (home), 201-266-5300, ext. 306 (work)

Black Panther Collective. P.O. Box 20735, Park West Station, New York, NY 10025-1516. Contact: Thomas McCreary. Phone: 212-473-1140, fax: 212-473-3525.

Center for Constitutional Rights. 666 Broadway, 7Th Floor, New York, NY 10012.

Switchboard: 212-614-6464

Ron Daniels, Executive Director, 212-614-6468

Gabe Torres, Coordinator, MSRC, 212-614-6429

David Love, MSRC, 212-614-6470

MSRC Hotline: 800-764-0235

Fax: 212-614-6499

E-mail: CCR@igc.apc.org

Center For Immigrant Rights. Phone: 212-505-6890, fax: 212-995-5876. Roseann Micallef.

Center For Law and Social Justice, Medgar Evers College. 1150 Carroll Street, Brooklyn, NY 11225. Provides free legal counseling, referrals and representation at CCRB. Phone: 718-953-4390. Joan Gibbs.

Citizens' Commission on Policing. 348 West 49th Street, Suite 1D, NY. NY 10019. Phone: 212-974-0294. New organization for monitoring the police, exposing and mobilizing against police abuse, educating the public and law enforcement agencies. Publishes a newsletter called NYC Cop Watch. Contact Hector Soto (former Commissioner CCRB) or Joe Catrambone (former Deputy Commissioner, CCRB)

Civilian Complaint Review Board (New York City). Phone: 212-442-8833 or 800--341-2272.

Community Justice Center. 1825 Park Avenue, Suite 604, NY, NY 10035. Phone: 212-427-4545; Fax: 212-427-3132. Edie Ellis.

December 12th Movement. Contact: Roger Wareham. 1851 Th Avenue, Suite 20, NY, NY 10026. Phone: 718-398-1766, Fax: 212-678-2548, Beeper: 917-967-8776, E-mail: RSW@talkingdrum.com

Latino Officers Association. P.O. Box 09-0595, Brooklyn, New York 11209-0595. Phone: 212-726-3351. Anthony Miranda.

The Legal Aid Society (NYC). 212-577-3355. 718-286-2000. 718-722-3100. fax: 718-286-2286.

NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund. 99 Hudson Street, NY., NY 10013. Phone: 219-1900. Fax: 212-226-7592. Ted Shaw or Gloria Browne.

National Association of Korean Americans. 276 Fifth Avenue, #806, NY< NY 10001. Phone: 212-679-3482, fax: 212-481-9569. E-mail: NAKAUSA@aol.com. John H. Kim, General Secretary.

National Black Police Association. 3251 Mt. Pleasant Street NW, Washington, DC 20010. Phone: 202-986-2070, Fax: 202-986-0410. Ronald Hampton, Executive Director.

National Coalition on Police Accountability (N-COPA). 59 East. Van Buren, Suite 2418, Chicago, IL 60605. Phone: 312-663-5392. fax: 312-663-5396. Contact: Mary Powers. N-COPA publishes a newsletter called Policing By Consent.

National Conference of Black Lawyers. Phone: 212-864-4000. fax: 212-222-2680. Florence Morgan, 718-286-2181.

National Lawyers Guild. 126 University Place. NY, NY 10003. Phone: 212-627-2656, Fax: 212-627-2404.

Neighborhood Defenders Service of Harlem. Phone: 212-876-5500.

N.Y.C. Commission on Human Rights. Phone: 212-306-7500. Bias hotline: 212-662-2427.

New York Division of Criminal Justice Services. Phone: 518-485-7576.

Parents Against Police Brutality. Antonio and Margarita Rosario. 2784 Claflin Avenue, Bronx, NY 10468. 718-601-1863.

 

Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund. 99 Hudson Street, Suite 1401, NY, NY 10013. Phone: 212-219-3360, Fax: 212-431-4276. Juan Figueroa.

Queens Coalition Against Police Violence. P.O. Box 656592, Fresh Meadows, NY 11365-6592. Phone: 516-627-4262.

Rev. Al Sharpton, (National Action Network) Headquarters: 1941 Madison Avenue, NY, NY 10035. Phone: 212-987-5020. Fax: 212-987-5024.

Victim Services Counseling (NYC). Manhattan: 212-577-3800. Brooklyn: 718-827-4700.

WBAI (99.5 FM). 505 Eighth Avenue, NY, NY 10018. Phone: 212-279-0707. Fax: 212-564-5359. Listener sponsored, community oriented radio station. Utrice Leid, Errol Maitland, Bernard White, Jose Santiago.

SUGGESTED READINGS

(Books, Reports & Articles)

 

Police Brutality and Excessive Force in the New York City Police Department - Amnesty International, United States of America (NY, 1996)

Black Power- Kwame Ture & Charles V. Hamilton

Black Robes, White Justice - Judge Bruce Wright

Black Police In America - W. Marvin Dulaney

Black Police, White Society - Stephen Leinen

Criminalizing A Race - Dr. Charshee C.L. McIntyre

Crime Pays - Cashing In on Black Prisoners, Emerge Magazine, (October, 1997)

COINTELPRO Papers - Ward Churchill & Jim Vanderwall

In The Matter of Color - (Race & The American Legal Process), A. Leon Higenbotham, jr.

Kerner Commission - Fred Harris & Tom Wicker

Know Your Rights: Stop Police Brutality - Police & Racial Violence Project, Center for Law and Social Justice, Medgar Evers College

Live From Death Row - Mumia Abu Jamal

On The Line: Police Brutality and its Remedies - American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU, 1991)

Prison Industrial Complex - John Flateau

Racial Matters - O. Reilly

Search and Destroy - Jerome G. Miller

Tin For Sale - John Manca & Cosgrove

The Police Mystique: An Insider's Look at Cops, Crime, and the Criminal Justice System - Anthony Bouza (NY, Plenum Press) 1990

OTHER SUGGESTED READING MATERIAL...

The Psychopathic Racial Personality & Other Essays - Bobbie E. Wright, PH.D

White Lies - Nick Davies

What's Justice For Some - Bruce Wasserstein & Mark J. Green

Anpao - Jamake Hightower

A Short Walk - Alice Childress

Black History Lost, Stolen and Strayed - Narrated By Bill Cosby

Black Is The Color Of My TV Tube - Gil Noble

Bringing The Black Boy To Manhood - Nathan Hare, Ph.D and Julia Hare, Ph.D

Coming Of Age - Paul Hill, Jr.

Developing Positive Self- Images and Discipline In Black Children - Jawanza Kunjufu

Down These Mean Streets - Piri Thomas

Go Tell It On The Mountain - James Baldwin

Harriet Tubman Conductor on the Underground Railroad - Ann Petry

Heart At Wounded Knee - Dee Brown

Hip-Hop vs MAAT - Jawanza Kunjufu

I Make My Own Rules - LL Cool J

Makes Me Wanna Holler - Nathan McCall

No Disrespect - Sister Souljah

The Autobiography of Malcolm X - Alex Haley

Things Fall Apart - Chinua Acheba

To Be Popular or Smart: The Black Peer Group - Jawanza Kunjufu